AA_SEP_V15

Damages vs. Normal Wear and Tear Page 56 A publication of the Apartment Association of Greater Los Angeles • September 2018 • $7.50 Who’s the Guy Behind Prop 10? Page 46 Bed Bugs 101 Page 62 Page 84 Court cost only$495.00 LARent control or Section8only Uncontestedevictioncost only special DTNLA, VanNuys, Chatsworth, SantaMonica, Lancaster Sheriff LockOut included COUPON $495 specialconditionsapply VOTE NO ON PROP 10 THE FLAWS PROP 10 Allows regulation of single family homes Prop 10 allows government to dictate pricing for privately owned single-family homes, controlling how much homeowners can charge to rent out their home – or even just a room. It may even lead to bureaucrats charging homeowners a fee for taking their home off the rental market. HOW WE KNOW: Legislative Analyst’s Office analysis of Prop 10 (A.G. File No. 2017-041), December 12, 2017 In 1995, the Legislature enacted the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act (Costa-Hawkins), which placed limitations on locally enacted rent control laws. Specifically, Costa-Hawkins prohibited local rent control rules from applying to housing first occupied on or after February 1, 1995 and single-family homes. ...The measure Places bureaucrats in charge of housing with the power to add additional fees Prop 10 puts as many as 539 rental boards in charge of housing and gives government agencies unlimited power to add fees on housing that will be passed on to tenants in the form of higher rents – making homes and apartments even more expensive. HOW WE KNOW: Legislative Analyst’s Office analysis of Prop 10 (A.G. File No. 2017-041), December 12, 2017 Rent control laws typically are administered by local rent boards, which are funded through fees on regulated property owners. …Depending on actions taken by local governments, these costs could range Drives up the cost of existing housing Prop 10’s new government fees and regulations will give homeowners a huge financial incentive to convert rental properties into more profitable uses like short-term vacation rentals, increasing the cost of existing housing and making it even harder for renters to find affordable housing in the future. HOW WE KNOW: Legislative Analyst’s Office analysis of Prop 10 (A.G. File No. 2017-041), December 12, 2017 Conversion of Rental Housing to Ownership Housing. Owners of rental housing subject to rent control are more likely to convert their properties to Find out more at: WWW.READITFORYOURSELF.COM Donate Today! www.Prop10Flaws.com Affordable Housing Act The People of the State of California do hereby ordain as follows: Section 1. Title. This Act shall be known and may be cited as “Affordable Housing Act.” Section 2. Findings and Declarations. Section 3. Purposes and Intent. Section 4. Affordable Housing Act shall be codified by repealing the following sections of the Civil Code: Sections 1954.50, 1954.51, 1954.52 and 1954.53 of Chapter 2.7 of Title 5 of Part 4 of Division 3 of the Civil Code are repealed. Section 5. Affordable Housing Act shall be further codified by adding the following section to the Civil Code: Section 1954.54. (a) A city, county, or city and county shall have the authority to adopt a local charter provision, ordinance or regulation that governs a landlord’s right to establish and increase rental rates on a dwelling or housing unit. (b) In accordance with California law, a landlord’s right to a fair rate of return on a property shall not be abridged by a city, county, or city and county. Section 6. Liberal Construction This Act shall be broadly construed to accomplish its purposes. Section 7. Amendment and Repeal Pursuant to Article II, Section 10, Subdivision ( c ), of the California Constitution, the Legislature may amend this Act to further its purposes by a statute passed in each house by roll call vote entered in the Journal, two-thirds of the membership concurring, signed by the Governor. No statute restricting or eliminating the powers that have been restored by this Act to a city, county, or city and county to establish residential rental rates shall become effective unless approved by a majority of the electorate. Section 8. Severability If any provision of this Act or the application thereof to any person or circumstances is held invalid, that invalidity shall not affect other provisions or applications of the Act which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and to this end the provisions of this Act are severable. Section 9. Conflicting Measures In the event that this Act and any other measure addressing the authority of local government agencies to establish residential rental rates shall appear on the same statewide election ballot, the provision of the other measure or measures shall be deemed to be in conflict with this Act. In the event that this Act receives a greater number of affirmative votes than another measure deemed to be in conflict with it, the provisions of this Act shall prevail in their entirety, and the other measure or measures shall be null and void. Section 10. Legal Defense Notwithstanding any other provision of law, if the State, a government agency, or any of its officials fail to defend the constitutionality of this Act, following its approval by the voters, the proponents shall have the authority to intervene in any court action challenging the constitutionality of this Act for the purpose of defending its constitutionality, whether in state or federal court, and whether such action is in any trial court, on appeal, or on discretionary review by the Supreme Court of California or the Supreme Court of the United States. The reasonable fees and costs of defending the action shall be a charge on funds appropriated to the California Department of Justice, which shall be satisfied promptly. Section 11. Effective Date Except as otherwise provided herein, this Act shall become effective the day after its approval by the voters.

RkJQdWJsaXNoZXIy NTUxNTc=